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The Tragedy We Will Never Forget

The night “The Dark Knight Rises” viewers expected to be just another night at the cinema turned out to be the worse night of their lives. At 12:38 A.M on July 20, 2012, James Eagan Holmes allegedly opened fire on the audience with tear gas grenades, a shotgun, a rifle, and two handguns. He killed…

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The night “The Dark Knight Rises” viewers expected to be just another night at the cinema turned out to be the worse night of their lives. At 12:38 A.M on July 20, 2012, James Eagan Holmes allegedly opened fire on the audience with tear gas grenades, a shotgun, a rifle, and two handguns. He killed 12 people and injured 58 people. Those who lost their lives were Gordon Cowden, Rebecca Wingo, Jesse Childress, John Larimer, Matt McQuinn, Alex Sullivan, Jessica Ghawi, Jonathan Blunk, Alexander C. Teves, Micayla Medek, Alexander J. Boik, and Veronica Moses-Sullivan.
Officials reported when James was unresistingly arrested, he called himself “The Joker,” a character from its preceded, “The Dark Knight.” Some described James as “bizarre, weird, a loner.” His profiles on social networks such as Adultfinder and Match, he asked the viewers, “Will you visit me in prison?” James didn’t have a criminal record, a degree in neuroscience, and was a member of several honor societies prior to 2012. Now he’s being charged with 24 counts of first degree murder, 116 counts of attempted murder, causing violence, and possession of explosive devices.
So what drove him over the edge?
A motive still have yet to be determined. But what possible motive could the catalyst for this reprehensible crime be? The lives that were taken and their families, the victims that survived, all of Aurora, and the whole world are still shell-shocked and grieving.
There aren’t any words or answers that can explain this travesity—none that would ever solve or contain the heartache, pain, and sorrow that we are feeling. But the question that still remains and should be raised—will the violence, the gun control, ever stop? Should the world be confined to metal detectors, more detailed security in cinemas and such? Have our community gotten to the point where we should be imprisoned in our own homes, afraid to come out and just step out onto the porch?
Robert F. Kennedy said it best, “What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred. What we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love and wisdom, and compassion towards one another, and a feeling of justice towards those who still suffer within our country whether they be white or whether they be black.”
As Americans and as a nation we owe it to ourselves, our families and communities to unite and try to rectify this so it can’t happen again. We owe it to ourselves, our families, and communities. Love, compassion, and wisdom are the essentials to life and America desperately needs that. All the hatred, violence, cruelty towards our fellowman or fellow-woman because of their ethnicity, sexual preference, religion or whatever it may be is not the answer to the problem. Love is the only solution.
In closing, the lyrics of “My Country, ‘Tis of Thee” should ring true in our hearts—“Our fathers’ God to Thee, Author of liberty, To Thee we sing. Long may our land be bright, With freedom’s holy light, Protect us by Thy might, Great God our King.”
Please keep the victims and their families in your prayers as well as our nation as a whole.
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Sports

Reggie Bush: Paying college athletes will ‘destroy some people’

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College athletes getting paid for their services has been a worthy argument for a long time, but the NCAA finally supports a proposal to allow college athletes to sign endorsement deals and receive payment for their work after some of the best basketball recruits in the country have declared for the NBA’s G League instead of attending college.

While being paid for their work certainly is a step in the right direction, former NFL star Reggie Bush doesn’t think it’s such a great idea.

“Guidance is the one thing that young athletes coming through the college system miss on so much,” Bush told Playboy, according to ESPN. “I missed on it. They’re about to start paying college athletes. This is something that has never been experienced before, and it’s going to destroy some people if their foundation is not in the right place.”

A formal proposal for the new rules is set to be submitted no later than October to the NCAA board, and they will then vote on the proposal sometime before January 2021.

Bush was a two-time All-American running back during his days at USC, and helped the school win back-to-back titles in 2003 and 2004. He won the Heisman Trophy as college football’s best player in 2005, but forfeited the award in 2010 after the NCAA found that Bush received money and gifts from sports agents when he wasn’t allowed to do so.

The 35-year-old went on to have a successful NFL career after his collegiate days at USC. He played for the New Orleans Saints, Detroit Lions, Miami Dolphins, Buffalo Bills and San Francisco 49ers before hanging up his cleats in 2017.

It’s weird to think that Bush is against athletes being paid for endorsement deals, especially considering he improperly accepted cash during his collegiate days.

Many college standouts will be able to use the money they earn to take care of their families, and that alone is a terrific reason why paying them is the right thing to do. They perform like professional athletes, earn their colleges and universities massive amounts of money and provide entertainment to fans, so why shouldn’t they be paid?

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Veterans Affairs Gives 1,300 Vets Unproven COVID-19 Drug Touted By Trump

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The federal Department of Veterans Affairs has been giving 1,300 veterans hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for the coronavirus since late March — even though the drug has not been proven to be effective against the illness and may even trigger fatal heart problems.

In a study of 100,000 patients with COVID-19 published Friday in the medical journal The Lancet, patients who received hydroxychloroquine had a “significantly higher risk of death” compared to those who were not given the drug. “We were unable to confirm a benefit of hydroxychloroquine” on in-hospital outcomes for COVID-19, the researchers concluded.

An April study of veterans who were given the drug — relentlessly hawked by President Donald Trump — produced similar findings.

Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie said in a letter Friday to Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) that despite mounting concerns about the drug, the VA will continue to use hydroxychloroquine for veterans.

Revelations of the use of the controversial antimalarial drug have sparked concerns about the effects it may have on veterans, many of whom are older and have underlying health conditions that make them more susceptible to a fatal side effect of the drug: heart arrhythmias, or irregular heartbeats.

“Veterans’ groups remain deeply concerned that the VA has made large purchases of this drug and appears to have administered it to veterans despite the well-known, and in some cases, fatal risks,” Schumer wrote Wilkie earlier this month.

After Wilkie’s letter on Friday, Schumer responded in a statement later that day, saying, “This drug may be useless or even harmful for COVID-19 patients, but the VA continues to administer it to hundreds of vets. Why are we just learning this?”

“We need to know what the basis was for using this drug against the consensus of science, which called into question its effectiveness in treating COVID-19,” he continued. “We also need to know who is authorizing these new trials, what facilities are participating and what families are being told.”

Trump has been aggressively pitching hydroxychloroquine since March, even though the drug had not yet undergone clinical trials examining its effectiveness against COVID-19.

“What do we have to lose?” he asked during a briefing.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the World Health Organization have both warned against using the drug to treat COVID-19.

Last Monday, the president attacked a study of veterans treated with the drug that showed no benefits against the coronavirus. He called the findings a “Trump enemy statement,” insisting they were politically motivated. He then claimed that he had been taking the drug for weeks, though he stopped on Friday.

The Trump administration ordered 29 million doses of hydroxychloroquine before it underwent trials for COVID-19 treatment. The VA also bulk-ordered some 6.3 million doses, according to Wilkie’s letter.

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Prince Harry and Prince William Are Back on Speaking Terms, A Royal Friend Revealed

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It’s been a tough few years for Prince Harry and Prince William‘s relationship, with rumors of a royal feud cropping up long before Harry, in ITV documentary Harry & Meghan: An African Journey, acknowledged all wasn’t well between the brothers.

“Part of this role and part of this job and this family, being under the pressure that it’s under, stuff happens but we’re brothers,” Harry said in the doc. “We’ll always be brothers, and we’re certainly on different paths at the moment, but I’ll always be there for him, and he’ll always be there for me. We don’t see each other as much as we used to because we’re so busy, but I love him dearly, and the majority of the stuff is created out of nothing, but you know, as brothers you have good days, you have bad days.”

Well, it sounds like things are finally on the up between the princes. Speaking to royal correspondent Katie Nicholl of the Sunday Times, an unnamed friend said the brothers started talking more after father Prince Charles was diagnosed with coronavirus, from which he has since recovered. “I don’t think it’s returned to everything being rosy, but it is better,” the friend explained. “Hearing their father wasn’t well helped bring them back together and there is now more regular communication.” Happy to hear it!

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