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Should I Allow My Child To Play Football

The game of football has a serious problem and it’s been in the news for a while now. Players are experiencing long-term problems due to concussions. Memory loss, dizziness, headaches, cognitive and emotional dysfunction, weird neurological diseases, like chronic traumatic encephalopathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and even suicide. Now, the problem seems to be taking its…

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The game of football has a serious problem and it’s been in the news for a while now. Players are experiencing long-term problems due to concussions.

Memory loss, dizziness, headaches, cognitive and emotional dysfunction, weird neurological diseases, like chronic traumatic encephalopathy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and even suicide.

Now, the problem seems to be taking its toll at the very earliest entry point says Pop Warner. Between 2010 and 2012, Pop Warner saw a 9.5% decrease (nearly 24,000 players) in the number of players. That marks the largest decrease in the history of the league. The Chief Medical Examiner says a majority of that decrease is because parents are worried about their kids getting concussions.

The question is should you let your child play football? The answer, of course, is complicated, because the question is complicated. It’s hard to know where to begin. What to believe. Who to trust. How to weigh the risks against the rewards.

So, why shouldn’t you let your child play football?

Researchers at Purdue University are slowly uncovering a far more serious problem. There is a real possibility that concussions are only the most obvious signs of damage and that even players without concussions suffer mental impairment during football season.

The Purdue researchers worked with Jefferson High School in Indiana and, in the first year of research, fitted 21 football helmets with accelerometers that would measure the impact of the hits they were taking.

Researchers did brain scans and cognitive tests on the players throughout the season. The findings, originally publish in the “Journal of Neurotrauma,” should send a shiver through anyone who loves the game. Nearly half the players who appeared to be uninjured still showed impairment in brain activity. The second year’s research, just recently released, shows more of the same. In all, of the 31 players who did not suffer a concussion, 17 had impaired scores on the cognitive tests.

The focused on this research has been obscured by the growing concern over concussions. There were many more stories about the deaths of former NFL players  (notably Junior Seau) who committed suicide and was discovered to suffer from CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy), which is a form of brain damage common to boxers and now, football players.

 

So, why should you let your child play football?

Helmet to helmet hits are greatly diminishing. The helmet to helmet hit will never be totally eliminated from the game of football, but it has and will be significantly reduced. Unless you have been under a rock for the last three years, anyone involved with football has been made aware of the brain trauma associated with concussions. Therefore, coaches at all levels of football should be more proactive than ever in teaching proper head placement for tackling and blocking techniques.

Liability could be another reason to make the game safer. Coaches from Pop Warner to high school have been made aware that they could face potential liability for creating and/or encouraging unsafe methods, techniques and practices. I’m certain everyone knows the NFL is facing lawsuits from their own players, so what’s to stop college, high school or youth players from doing the same? The growing shadow of liability should keep those in charge (coaches, trainers, and conditioning coaches) honest about making sure the players don’t put themselves at risk, especially for head trauma.

Trickle down education for future players. The NFL is spending millions on educating youth players on the proper techniques of blocking and tackling. Programs such as Play 60 and Heads Up have reached tens of thousands of children already. Just like in rugby where it is second nature for players to tackle with their shoulder, a new breed of football player is emerging that’s better educated through camps and clinics on how to protect themselves, and their opponents from injury.

What we like to call “old school” coaches, are rapidly dying off.  A lot of them taught to lead with butt of helmet. These coaches weren’t being barbaric but they were teaching techniques of the game that were taught to them. When Bill Walsh came on the scene and started winning Super Bowls with short, crisp, cerebral and non-contact practices, the football world took notice and started adopting his philosophy. In addition, as the game continues to speed up with spread offenses, coaches stuck in teaching strictly a physical brand of football are being weeded out and left behind.

Many in football mindset has changed. 2011 and 2012 will be known as the years where the NFL brand of football went soft but safer. Anybody watching noticed more penalties and more reprimands by the announcers when a hit seemed either too low, too high, unsafe and/or just too vicious. It’s just not cool anymore. We all still love a great hit but not when there is a risk of concussion or serious injury. Sure, there will always be a risk for injury but the risk of suffering a serious injury while skateboarding, surfing, and/or mountain biking may be even greater.

So, what should you do?

Football is fun. The game is inherently dangerous, rooted in violence and physical domination, hitting and tackling, knocking your opponent on their behinds before they do the same to you. More than four million American children will play high school and youth football.

Week after week, season after season, the sport teaches life lessons, rallies communities, provides excitement and entertainment for millions. At the youth level, most players walk away from the game with fond memories and without serious, lasting harm.

I am a huge football fan and I think my grandson Joshua would be a great player. The problem is my daughter Ebonii doesn’t want him to play football. I guess I’ll be buying a basketball. But I feel lucky that I don’t have to make that decision with all we know now.

As parents, grandparents or guardian I think we have to be careful and informed, but certainly not scared. Then and only then I believe you will make the best decision for your child.

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Boxer Gervonta Davis Involved in Minor Plane Crash, Documents Aftermath

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Gervonta Davis just, miraculously, walked away from a plane crash relatively unscathed — and it sounds like what’s hurting him the most in the aftermath are his feet … and his caboose.

The professional boxer went live Saturday to document a terrifying encounter he says he and his crew had just gone through after boarding a private jet … which apparently failed to properly take off and crash landed back down to the airport grounds it was trying to leave.

Thankfully, it doesn’t appear the aircraft got very far up before coming back down to Earth — because Gervonta and other passengers seemed more or less okay … with their health and bodies intact.

That’s not to say Gervonta wasn’t feeling some hurt afterwards — on his live feed, he noted that his booty was aching like no other … this while he wrapped his feet in gauze. He’s pretty jovial about the whole thing, which is great to see, but this could’ve easily been way worse.

Gervonta also was able to get some shots of the downed plane, and it sure looks like something went wrong internally. There were also fire engines that showed up on the scene to evaluate the damage and tend to anyone’s injuries. Again, though, most everyone seems to be fine … which is absolutely incredible, because it appears there were even children aboard, based on a photo Gervonta posted shortly before getting on his flight. His video doesn’t capture any kids, though.

It’s unclear what exactly caused the malfunction — but you can hear Gervonta and his friends speculate on what happened … seems like there might’ve been some overheating of some sort. They also appear to be discussing some of the flight maneuvers the pilot(s) were using in the air … and the group seems to think that may have attributed to it going down.

Stay tuned while we here at Prestige try to get a hold of Gervonta’s team for more answers.

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Breaking News

Tennis Player Coco Gauff Tests Positive For COVID-19, Will Not Attend Olympics

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17-year-old tennis player Cori “Coco” Gauff was slated to be on the U.S. tennis team at the upcoming Olympic Games, but has withdrawn after testing positive for COVID-19.

She broke the news via social media.

“I am so disappointed to share the news that I have tested positive for COVID and won’t be able to play in the Olympic Games in Tokyo,” she wrote in a note. “It has always been a dream of mine to represent the USA at the Olympics, and I hope there will be many more chances for me to make this come true in the future.” At #25, Gauff is the youngest player with a Women’s Tennis Association ranking in the top 100 .

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At 15, Gauff shocked the sports world when she beat tennis icon Venus Williams in the opening round of Wimbledon in 2019. She then bested Williams again during her Australian Open debut in January 2020 and defeated Naomi Osaka at the same event.

Gauff finished her statement by wishing all of her fellow athletes well. “I want to wish TEAM USA best of luck and a safe game for every Olympian and the entire Olympic family.”

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Magic’s Jonathan Isaac stands for national anthem as teammates, opponents kneel

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Orlando Magic power forward Jonathan Isaac became the first NBA player to stand during the national anthem following the season restart … deciding against both kneeling and wearing a Black Lives Matter shirt.

The league’s coaches, refs and players — from LeBron James to Zion Williamson — have been using the anthem demonstrations to raise awareness as games pick back up in Orlando … a gesture that is being supported by NBA commish Adam Silver.

Isaac became the first player to choose to stand as the anthem was played before the Magic’s match-up with the Brooklyn Nets on Friday … while the rest of the team’s players and staffers took a knee.

It’s worth noting — Silver says everyone will have the option to kneel during the anthem without consequence … despite a league rule requiring players to stand.

The same goes for anyone who wishes to stand — no one is saying the players HAVE to kneel, either.

So far, Jonathan hasn’t commented on his decision to stand publicly — because the game is currently being played. But, when he does, we’ll update here.

Charles Barkley spoke about the demonstrations on Thursday during TNT’s “Inside The NBA,” saying, “The national anthem means different things to different people.”

“I’m glad these guys are unified. If people don’t kneel, they’re not a bad person. I want to make that perfectly clear. I’m glad they had unity, but if we have a guy who doesn’t want to kneel because the anthem means something to him, he should not be vilified.”

The Magic released a statement in support of the demonstration, saying, “The DeVos Family and the Orlando Magic organization fully supports Magic players who have chosen to leverage their professional platform to send a peaceful and powerful message condemning bigotry, racial injustice and the unwarranted use of violence by police, especially against people of color.”

“We are proud of the positive impact our players have made and join with them in the belief that sports can bring people together — bridging divides and promoting inclusion, equality, diversity and unity.”

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