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Ex-football Player Charged With Murder in Wife’s Grisly Death

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A former professional football player sliced his wife’s neck and then crawled on the ground outside their rented Utah condominium before flagging down a police officer, prosecutors said in murder charges filed Monday.

The bloody scene in the ski town of Park City indicated that Keri “KC” McClanahan, 28, put up a desperate struggle before she was killed. The murder weapon was a small, sharp knife she’d worn sheathed in a nylon paracord bracelet, charging documents state.

Police found her husband, Anthony D. McClanahan, 46, covered in blood and crawling on his stomach outside early in the morning of Nov. 2. He lifted himself up just enough to flag down a police officer, then dropped back down and began convulsing, his arms making a “snow angel motion,” the officer on scene told prosecutors.

No attorney was listed for him in court records Monday, and a phone number for him went unanswered.

Anthony McClanahan was treated for minor injuries. He originally told officers he, his wife and baby had been attacked, but investigators found no evidence of anyone else going into the condo or any baby at their place in the Park Regency.

His wife’s body was found in the condominium he had rented after someone else at the building called 911, saying they’d seen him crawling low to the ground through the hallways and calling for help. Keri McClanahan had suffered several cuts to the front, back and sides of her neck, as well as other defensive wounds and carpet burns.

McClanahan had been charged with child kidnapping last month after authorities said he took his 8-year-old son from a previous relationship from his school in Arizona on Oct. 3 and traveled with him through Nevada and Utah.

He was arrested in Utah on Oct. 12 and gave his son back, then bonded out of jail a week later.

He and his wife rented the condo in Park City a few days later, charging documents said.

Originally from Bakersfield, California, McClanahan played four years with the Calgary Stampeders of the Canadian Football League in the mid-1990s after a collegiate career at Washington State University. He was in training camp with the Dallas Cowboys of the NFL in 1994 but never played in a game.

Keri McClanahan, who went by KC, had been planning to leave her husband but wanted to help him get on his feet first, said her sister, Heather Gauf.

The couple had met last year when he was working as a personal trainer in her hometown of Bellingham, Washington, and he pushed for a fast wedding, Gauf said. “It worried me a lot,’” she said, but “he kind of had us fooled.”

After the January 2017 wedding, they moved to Arizona together and began traveling to volunteer in hurricane-affected areas.

But his jealousy began to emerge and in September he got frustrated about a missed donation and punched her, Gauf said. He’d sometimes refer to the effects of head injuries he’d suffered during his football career, though Gauf doubts they were the root cause of the violence.

After the punch, Keri McClanahan returned home to Washington, but her husband continued to contact her even as he left Arizona with his son.

Anthony McClanahan ended up in Utah because he has family there and wanted his son to be an extra in a Disney TV production, Gauf said.

Keri McClanahan eventually met him in Utah to help with his son, and stayed to help him get back on his feet after his arrest, Gauf said.

“She’s such a sweetheart,” said Gauf, who remembered her sister as an adventurous, athletic woman with a great sense of humor who leaves two children of her own. “He definitely dimmed her light so much and it was really hard to watch,” she said.

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Tennis Player Coco Gauff Tests Positive For COVID-19, Will Not Attend Olympics

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17-year-old tennis player Cori “Coco” Gauff was slated to be on the U.S. tennis team at the upcoming Olympic Games, but has withdrawn after testing positive for COVID-19.

She broke the news via social media.

“I am so disappointed to share the news that I have tested positive for COVID and won’t be able to play in the Olympic Games in Tokyo,” she wrote in a note. “It has always been a dream of mine to represent the USA at the Olympics, and I hope there will be many more chances for me to make this come true in the future.” At #25, Gauff is the youngest player with a Women’s Tennis Association ranking in the top 100 .

00:00 of 00:49Volume 0% More VideosCoco Gauff Beats Defending Champ Naomi Osaka at Australian OpenPart 1: COVID-19 The Black SouthCOVID-19: Black Folks Say Data Is PoliticalDr. Robinson discusses Community Impact of COVID-19Dr. Patrice Harris Answers COVID-19 QuestionsDr. Powell Shares Reliable Sources For COVID-19 InformationThe OverExplainer: Body PositivityOctavia Spencer On Staying Mentally Well During COVID-19

At 15, Gauff shocked the sports world when she beat tennis icon Venus Williams in the opening round of Wimbledon in 2019. She then bested Williams again during her Australian Open debut in January 2020 and defeated Naomi Osaka at the same event.

Gauff finished her statement by wishing all of her fellow athletes well. “I want to wish TEAM USA best of luck and a safe game for every Olympian and the entire Olympic family.”

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Magic’s Jonathan Isaac stands for national anthem as teammates, opponents kneel

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Orlando Magic power forward Jonathan Isaac became the first NBA player to stand during the national anthem following the season restart … deciding against both kneeling and wearing a Black Lives Matter shirt.

The league’s coaches, refs and players — from LeBron James to Zion Williamson — have been using the anthem demonstrations to raise awareness as games pick back up in Orlando … a gesture that is being supported by NBA commish Adam Silver.

Isaac became the first player to choose to stand as the anthem was played before the Magic’s match-up with the Brooklyn Nets on Friday … while the rest of the team’s players and staffers took a knee.

It’s worth noting — Silver says everyone will have the option to kneel during the anthem without consequence … despite a league rule requiring players to stand.

The same goes for anyone who wishes to stand — no one is saying the players HAVE to kneel, either.

So far, Jonathan hasn’t commented on his decision to stand publicly — because the game is currently being played. But, when he does, we’ll update here.

Charles Barkley spoke about the demonstrations on Thursday during TNT’s “Inside The NBA,” saying, “The national anthem means different things to different people.”

“I’m glad these guys are unified. If people don’t kneel, they’re not a bad person. I want to make that perfectly clear. I’m glad they had unity, but if we have a guy who doesn’t want to kneel because the anthem means something to him, he should not be vilified.”

The Magic released a statement in support of the demonstration, saying, “The DeVos Family and the Orlando Magic organization fully supports Magic players who have chosen to leverage their professional platform to send a peaceful and powerful message condemning bigotry, racial injustice and the unwarranted use of violence by police, especially against people of color.”

“We are proud of the positive impact our players have made and join with them in the belief that sports can bring people together — bridging divides and promoting inclusion, equality, diversity and unity.”

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Reggie Bush: Paying college athletes will ‘destroy some people’

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College athletes getting paid for their services has been a worthy argument for a long time, but the NCAA finally supports a proposal to allow college athletes to sign endorsement deals and receive payment for their work after some of the best basketball recruits in the country have declared for the NBA’s G League instead of attending college.

While being paid for their work certainly is a step in the right direction, former NFL star Reggie Bush doesn’t think it’s such a great idea.

“Guidance is the one thing that young athletes coming through the college system miss on so much,” Bush told Playboy, according to ESPN. “I missed on it. They’re about to start paying college athletes. This is something that has never been experienced before, and it’s going to destroy some people if their foundation is not in the right place.”

A formal proposal for the new rules is set to be submitted no later than October to the NCAA board, and they will then vote on the proposal sometime before January 2021.

Bush was a two-time All-American running back during his days at USC, and helped the school win back-to-back titles in 2003 and 2004. He won the Heisman Trophy as college football’s best player in 2005, but forfeited the award in 2010 after the NCAA found that Bush received money and gifts from sports agents when he wasn’t allowed to do so.

The 35-year-old went on to have a successful NFL career after his collegiate days at USC. He played for the New Orleans Saints, Detroit Lions, Miami Dolphins, Buffalo Bills and San Francisco 49ers before hanging up his cleats in 2017.

It’s weird to think that Bush is against athletes being paid for endorsement deals, especially considering he improperly accepted cash during his collegiate days.

Many college standouts will be able to use the money they earn to take care of their families, and that alone is a terrific reason why paying them is the right thing to do. They perform like professional athletes, earn their colleges and universities massive amounts of money and provide entertainment to fans, so why shouldn’t they be paid?

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